SALARY FOR MAKE UP ARTIST. SALARY FOR MAKE


Salary For Make Up Artist. Natural Makeup Video.



Salary For Make Up Artist





salary for make up artist






    make up
  • constitute: form or compose; "This money is my only income"; "The stone wall was the backdrop for the performance"; "These constitute my entire belonging"; "The children made up the chorus"; "This sum represents my entire income for a year"; "These few men comprise his entire army"

  • makeup: an event that is substituted for a previously cancelled event; "he missed the test and had to take a makeup"; "the two teams played a makeup one week later"

  • Cosmetics such as lipstick or powder applied to the face, used to enhance or alter the appearance

  • The composition or constitution of something

  • constitution: the way in which someone or something is composed

  • The combination of qualities that form a person's temperament





    salary
  • (salaried) receiving a salary; "salaried members of the staff"

  • wage: something that remunerates; "wages were paid by check"; "he wasted his pay on drink"; "they saved a quarter of all their earnings"

  • (salaried) compensated: receiving or eligible for compensation; "salaried workers"; "a stipendiary magistrate"

  • Pay a salary to





    artist
  • A person who produces paintings or drawings as a profession or hobby

  • (artistic) satisfying aesthetic standards and sensibilities; "artistic workmanship"

  • A person skilled at a particular task or occupation

  • a person whose creative work shows sensitivity and imagination

  • A person who practices any of the various creative arts, such as a sculptor, novelist, poet, or filmmaker

  • (artistic) relating to or characteristic of art or artists; "his artistic background"











salary for make up artist - Salary Tutor:




Salary Tutor: Learn the Salary Negotiation Secrets No One Ever Taught You


Salary Tutor: Learn the Salary Negotiation Secrets No One Ever Taught You



Jim Hopkinson details a novel way to get the the raise you deserve. Using these ten steps, you will be able to confidently and effectively negotiate your salary. With helpful tips and questions throughout, this book gives readers the tools to conquer "the evil HR lady."

While other books or websites might list a few standard bullet points on the subject from an expert in the HR field, Jim takes a "novel approach," weaving interesting stories, case studies, graphs, humor, and personal experience to make the topic come alive. The book also educates the reader on:


Discovering the two simple - but vital - questions you need to answer for success
Harnessing your social media network to gather valuable information
Mastering successful FBI negotiation techniques to your advantage
Creating a one-of-a-kind document to secure the highest salary range
Using Jim's "Right back at Ya" Method to regain control of an interview

Jim Hopkinson details a novel way to get the the raise you deserve. Using these ten steps, you will be able to confidently and effectively negotiate your salary. With helpful tips and questions throughout, this book gives readers the tools to conquer "the evil HR lady."

While other books or websites might list a few standard bullet points on the subject from an expert in the HR field, Jim takes a "novel approach," weaving interesting stories, case studies, graphs, humor, and personal experience to make the topic come alive. The book also educates the reader on:


Discovering the two simple - but vital - questions you need to answer for success
Harnessing your social media network to gather valuable information
Mastering successful FBI negotiation techniques to your advantage
Creating a one-of-a-kind document to secure the highest salary range
Using Jim's "Right back at Ya" Method to regain control of an interview










78% (11)





cow boy harper...prime minister of the great white north




cow boy harper...prime minister of the great white north





Cow Boy Harper...should have kept his mouth shut. He's angered Artist in the great white north with just a few stupid words and the absurd "new world order" mentality that is becoming so jaded.

Here's a great article concerning this issue...

MARGARET ATWOOD From Thursday's Globe and Mail - September 24, 2008 at
11:00 PM EDT

What sort of country do we want to live in? What sort of country do we
already live in? What do we like? Who are we?

At present, we are a very creative country. For decades, we've been
punching above our weight on the world stage - in writing, in popular
music and in many other fields. Canada was once a cultural void on the
world map, now it's a force. In addition, the arts are a large segment of
our economy: The Conference Board estimates Canada's cultural sector
generated $46-billion, or 3.8 per cent of Canada's GDP, in 2007. And,
according to the Canada Council, in 2003-2004, the sector accounted for an
"estimated 600,000 jobs (roughly the same as agriculture, forestry,
fishing, mining, oil & gas and utilities combined)."

But we've just been sent a signal by Prime Minister Stephen Harper that he
gives not a toss for these facts. Tuesday, he told us that some group
called "ordinary people" didn't care about something called "the arts."
His idea of "the arts" is a bunch of rich people gathering at galas
whining about their grants. Well, I can count the number of moderately
rich writers who live in Canada on the fingers of one hand: I'm one of
them, and I'm no Warren Buffett. I don't whine about my grants because I
don't get any grants. I whine about other grants - grants for young
people, that may help them to turn into me, and thus pay to the federal
and provincial governments the kinds of taxes I pay, and cover off the
salaries of such as Mr. Harper. In fact, less than 10 per cent of writers
actually make a living by their writing, however modest that living may
be. They have other jobs. But people write, and want to write, and pack
into creative writing classes, because they love this activity – not
because they think they'll be millionaires.

Every single one of those people is an "ordinary person." Mr. Harper's
idea of an ordinary person is that of an envious hater without a scrap of
artistic talent or creativity or curiosity, and no appreciation for
anything that's attractive or beautiful. My idea of an ordinary person is
quite different. Human beings are creative by nature. For millenniums we
have been putting our creativity into our cultures - cultures with unique
languages, architecture, religious ceremonies, dances, music, furnishings,
textiles, clothing and special cuisines. "Ordinary people" pack into the
cheap seats at concerts and fill theatres where operas are brought to them
live. The total attendance for "the arts" in Canada in fact exceeds that
for sports events. "The arts" are not a "niche interest." They are part of
being human.

Moreover, "ordinary people" are participants. They form book clubs and
join classes of all kinds - painting, dancing, drawing, pottery,
photography - for the sheer joy of it. They sing in choirs, church and
other, and play in marching bands. Kids start garage bands and make their
own videos and web art, and put their music on the Net, and draw their own
graphic novels. "Ordinary people" have other outlets for their creativity,
as well: Knitting and quilting have made comebacks; gardening is taken
very seriously; the home woodworking shop is active. Add origami, costume
design, egg decorating, flower arranging, and on and on ... Canadians, it
seems, like making things, and they like appreciating things that are
made.

They show their appreciation by contributing. Canadians of all ages
volunteer in vast numbers for local and city museums, for their art
galleries and for countless cultural festivals - I think immediately of
the Chinese New Year and the Caribana festival in Toronto, but there are
so many others. Literary festivals have sprung up all over the country -
volunteers set them up and provide the food, and "ordinary people" will
drag their lawn chairs into a field - as in Nova Scotia's Read by the Sea
- in order to listen to writers both local and national read and discuss
their work. Mr. Harper has signalled that as far as he is concerned, those
millions of hours of volunteer activity are a waste of time. He holds them
in contempt.

I suggest that considering the huge amount of energy we spend on creative
activity, to be creative is "ordinary." It is an age-long and normal human
characteristic: All children are born creative. It's the lack of any
appreciation of these activities that is not ordinary. Mr. Harper has
demonstrated that he has no knowledge of, or respect for, the capacities
and interests of "ordinary people.&qu











Max Linder




Max Linder





French postcard by Helio Paul et Vigier, Paris. Publicity card for the Pathe-Baby projector.

French comedian Max Linder (1883-1925), with his trademark silk hat, stick and moustache was an influential pioneer of the silent film. He was largely responsible for the creation of the classic style of silent slapstick comedy and he was the highest paid entertainer of his day.

Max Linder was born Gabriel-Maximilien Leuvielle in 1883 in Saint-Loubes, Gironde, France to a Jewish wine growing family. He grew up with a passion for the theater and at 17 he dropped out of school in order to join a touring theater troupe, which did not please his parents.. While working in Paris as an actor in the theater and vaudeville, Leuvielle became fascinated with motion pictures. In 1905 he took a job with Pathe Freres and in the following years he became a comedic actor, director, screenwriter, as well as a producer under the stage name, Max Linder. His debut was La premiere sortie d'un collegien/First Night Out (1905, Louis J. Gasnier). He created what was probably the first identifiable film character: ‘Max’, an elegant, joyful, romantic, top-hatted dandy, who appeared for the first time in Les Debuts d'un patineur/Max Learns to Skate (1907, Louis J. Gasnier) and would return in successive situation comedies. ‘Gentleman Max’ was frequently in hot water because of his penchant for beautiful women and the good life. When in his credits for Max et la doctoresse/Max and the female doctor (1909, Max Linder) the text “written by Max Linder and played by the author” appeared, it was the first time in film history that an author was mentioned in connection with a cinematic work.

After comedian Andre Deed went to Italy, Max Linder moved up to the comedy star No. 1 for Pathe. In 1910 he shot one comedy each week. By 1911, Linder was directing all his own films as well as writing the script and the universality of silent films brought Linder fame and fortune throughout Europe. By 1912, he was the highest-paid film star in the world, with an unprecedented salary of one million francs. His success didn't have any limits: whether Spain, Germany, Italy or Russia, Max Linder was everywhere welcomed with enthusiasm during his live entrances in the capital cities. In Russia the police had to call the Army for help so that Linder was able to leave the Moscow railroad station. One of the best and one of his more successful examples of his type of humor is the one-reeler Max et la Statue/Max and the Statue (1912, Max Linder). Max attends a costume ball, dressed as a suit of armor. After drinking too much at the party, he passes out on the sidewalk. Meanwhile, during the evening, a new suit of armor to be unveiled at the Louvre the next day is stolen by a pair of thieves. The police, discovering the theft, stumble upon Max. They take him back to the Louvre where he is unveiled for the Museum committee. They depart, whereupon the thieves return, take Max, and, back in the hideout, attempt to open the armor with tools. Max awakens, scares the burglars, then, in the final frame, strolls away, strumming a guitar. The weekly adventures of Max were impatiently awaited by faithful and enthusiastic audiences. In 1914 Linder decided to realize one of his old dreams: to start a cinema. He bought a cinema in Paris with 1,200 sears, created in 1912, the Kosmorama. The Cine Max Linder opened in December 1914. World War I brought a temporary end to Linder's career in film. Physically unfit for combat duty, he worked as a dispatch driver during the war until he was seriously wounded. He was gassed, and the illness that resulted would blight his career.

While in the hospital in 1916, Max Linder was visited by George K. Spoor, president of Essanay films. Having lost Charlie Chaplin, Spoor wanted Linder to "take his place" and offered him $5,000 per week to write, direct, and star in 12 three-reel comedies to be made in the studio's Chicago location. Linder went to the USA, but his first few American-made Max films didn't make the same impression as the Chaplin shorts. Recurring ill-health meant that his US films had little of the sparkle of his early French work. After only three were completed Linder headed back to Europa because of a pleurisy (according to Thomas Staedeli), or (according to Wikipedia) because Essanay could no longer afford to sustain the series, and cancelled production of the remaining films on his contract. For the convalescence of his pleurisy Linder went to the lake of Geneva. In 1919 it seemed like Max was his old self again and his screen version of Le Petit Cafe/The Little Cafe (1919, Raymond Bernard) was received enthusiastically by critics and audiences on both sides of the Atlantic. He made another attempt at filmmaking in Hollywood for the recently-formed United Artists (one of whose founders was Chaplin). He worked as a film producer, screenwriter, director and leading actor in three films: Seven Years B









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